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In The News

One of the world's leading percussion manufacturers is debuting a new line of drums designed to be more user-friendly -- and potentially healing -- for people with developmental disabilities.

As Congress looks to reauthorize the nation's primary education law, advocates are blasting proposed changes they say would lead to lower expectations for students with disabilities.

Training parents to enhance social interactions with their infant children may reduce the likelihood that kids at risk for autism will ultimately develop the disorder, researchers say.

In a case brought by developmental disability service providers, the U.S. Supreme Court is weighing what recourse such agencies have if they believe Medicaid is paying them too little.

As people with Down syndrome live longer than ever before, the National Institutes of Health is looking to reshape its efforts related to the chromosomal disorder.

There is a fresh effort in Congress to secure $10 million in federal funds to provide free tracking devices to individuals with autism and other disabilities who are at risk of wandering.

A family is fighting back with a federal civil rights complaint after being told they would need to provide a handler in order for their son's service dog to be allowed at school.

Individuals with intellectual disabilities who attend postsecondary programs are finding greater success in the job market than those who do not pursue further education, a new study suggests.

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